Posts tagged with stars

Celestial Hemispheres

Celestial Hemispheres

Stellatum Planisphaerium by Louis Vlasbloem from 1675.

Some background:

This double hemisphere celestial chart by Louis Vlasbloem, called Ludovico Vlasblom on the chart, is derived from the celestial hemispheres in Joan Blaeu’s world map. The small spheres depict the geo-centric and helio-centric configurations of the solar system. The very energetic expansion of Dutch maritime trade in the late 16th century and first two thirds of the 17th provided Europe with new astronomical knowledge of the Southern hemisphere, and in 1598 twelve new constellations formed by Petrus Plancius appeared on a Hondius globe. These were added to the Ptolemaic canon of 48 constellations making a total of 60. The newly discovered constellations of the southern hemisphere include: Pavo), Phoenix, Indus, and others, and Coma Berenices in the north.

Mechanical Books

Mechanical Books

Planetae et Radiationes in Cancri Dodecatemorio by Giovanni Paolo Galucci from 1588.

Beautiful hand-colored movable volvelle device depicting months and zodiac signs from Theatrum Mundi, et Temporis.

%s1 / %s2

Earth: So Bitchin’

Earth: So Bitchin'

This is a real place on actual Earth. I’m so glad I live here sometimes.

( via apod)

Stars and curiosities of the sky

Stars and curiosities of the sky

Les étoiles et les curiosités du ciel; description complète du ciel visible à l’il nu et de tous les objets célestes faciles à observer

( via the snail and the cyclops & jedwards)

Atlas of the Universe

Atlas of the Universe

A map of all known stars that lie within 20 light years of the Sun. There are a total of 83 known star systems within this distance containing 109 stars and 8 brown dwarfs.

Part of the Atlas of the Universe, a series of maps illustrating the so-large-as-to-be-impossible-to-internalize scale of the universe.

Hotter than the interiors of stars

Hotter than the interiors of stars

Sandia’s Z machine normally works like this: 20 million amps of electricity pass through a small core of vertical tungsten wires finer than human hairs. The core is about the size of a spool of thread. The wires dissolve instantly into a cloud of charged particles called a plasma.

The plasma, caught in the grip of the very strong magnetic field accompanying the electrical current, is compressed to the thickness of a pencil lead. This happens very rapidly, at a velocity that would fly a plane from New York to San Francisco in several seconds.

At that point, the ions and electrons have nowhere further to go. Like a speeding car hitting a brick wall, they stop suddenly, releasing energy in the form of X-rays that reach temperatures of several million degrees — the temperature of solar flares.