Keep in mind that the game is meant to be modified by changing your inputs (assumptions). The goal is to try to re-create the original situation; but even then you aren’t finished. Just because you’ve arrived doesn’t mean you got there the same way the original event did. But you’ve learned a lot about what was going on while you were doing it. Simulation is based on information; you’ve got to do your homework. Footnotes aren’t enough. Your system has to work and you have to be able to see why, or why not.

—Jim Dunnigan, “A Few Theoretical Remarks”

Up Against the Wall, Motherfucker!

Up Against the Wall, Motherfucker!

With the first anniversary of last spring’s demonstrations and of ‘CONNECTION’ fast approaching, we present a commemorative supplement to the supplement: a playable game simulation of spring on Morningside Heights. It has been designed with the same kinds of operations research and game theory techniques that are used by mathematicians, business, and the military to generate models of interaction that can be used to predict events in real life.

Up Against the Wall, Motherfucker is an early strategy game by Jim Dunnigan. Originally published in the Columbia Spectator in 1969, players could choose to play as the administration, or radicals who had seized a university building. The winner is the side that has gained the most support from various stakeholders at the university (alumni, trustees, middle-of-the-road students, etc.). You can view it as it originally appeared in the Spectator archives here.

( via ARPA Journal)

Fenced

Fenced

Josef Albers, Fenced, 1944
linoleum cut, 12 1/2 x 16 inches

Susan Torre

Susan Torre

( via rndrd via mosaia)

Reception Desk

Reception Desk

Lynn Cohen, Reception Desk, 1978
Gelatin silver print, 8” x 10”

A la Planchette

A la Planchette

The interior of the Bradbury Building in downtown L.A. has been in dozens of movies and tv shows including, perhaps most notably, Blade Runner.

The building was commissioned by a wealthy gold mine magnate by the name of Lewis L. Bradbury (no relation to Ray apparently).

Bradbury offered the commission to a draftsman with no architecture training called George Wyman, who refused, presumably because he did not actually know how to do architecture.

However, after he and his wife used a planchette to contact his dead brother Mark during a séance, he received the message:

Mark Wyman / take the / Bradbury building / and you will be / successful

The design for the building was then based on Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward:

Many believe Wyman was inspired by Edward Bellamy, whose 1887 novel “Looking Backward” described a building of some future time. “A vast hall of light,” Bellamy wrote, “received not alone from the windows on all sides but from the dome, the point of which was a hundred feet above…. The walls were frescoed in mellow tints, to soften without absorbing the light which flooded the interior.”

Where would the private eyes of the forties have been without laurel shrubberies to lurk in, sweeping front drives to turn the car in, terraces from which to observe the garden below, massive Spanish Colonial Revival doors on which to knock, and tiled Spanish Colonial Revival interiors for the knocking to echo in, and the bars of Spanish Colonial Revival windows to hold on, or rambling split-level ranch house plans in which to lose the opposition, and random rubble fireplace walls to pin suspects against, and dream-bedrooms in which the sun may be seen rising in heart-breaking picture-postcard splendor over the Hollywood Hills…and the essential swimming pool for the bodies.

—Reyner Banham, Los Angeles: The Architecture of Four Ecologies

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