Celestial Hemispheres

Celestial Hemispheres

Stellatum Planisphaerium by Louis Vlasbloem from 1675.

Some background:

This double hemisphere celestial chart by Louis Vlasbloem, called Ludovico Vlasblom on the chart, is derived from the celestial hemispheres in Joan Blaeu’s world map. The small spheres depict the geo-centric and helio-centric configurations of the solar system. The very energetic expansion of Dutch maritime trade in the late 16th century and first two thirds of the 17th provided Europe with new astronomical knowledge of the Southern hemisphere, and in 1598 twelve new constellations formed by Petrus Plancius appeared on a Hondius globe. These were added to the Ptolemaic canon of 48 constellations making a total of 60. The newly discovered constellations of the southern hemisphere include: Pavo), Phoenix, Indus, and others, and Coma Berenices in the north.

Mechanical Books

Mechanical Books

Planetae et Radiationes in Cancri Dodecatemorio by Giovanni Paolo Galucci from 1588.

Beautiful hand-colored movable volvelle device depicting months and zodiac signs from Theatrum Mundi, et Temporis.

Leo Belgicus

Leo Belgicus

Leo Belgicus (Novus XVII Inferioris Germaniae Provinciarum) by Famiani Strada (1648).

The Leo Belgicus is a map of the Low Countries (the current day Netherlands, Luxembourg and Belgium) drawn in the shape of a lion.

Seven Wonders of the World

Seven Wonders of the World

From Histoire de la Magie (The History of Magic), by Éliphas Lévi (Alphonse-Louis Constant), Paris, 1922.

( via obi scrapbook)
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