Craters of the Moon

Craters of the Moon

Props to the National Park Service for keeping it Müller-Brockmann 4 Life, but damn do these things stand out on a rack of brochures in a Visitors’ Center. Every other one is like “HAHA GET IT THE LETTERS ARE MADE OF ROPE BECAUSE THIS IS IDAHO AND THERE IS SAGEBRUSH HERE LIKE A COWBOY”, then this chill customer is all “I don’t even care if you see the craters of the moon. They should make a park just for me, the brochure.”

I like these so much that I am starting to feel bad for shitting Massimo Vignelli’s stupid subway map so much. Psyche.

%s1 / %s2

On the Subject of Labyrinths

On the Subject of Labyrinths

The 2nd floor of Holmes Castle.

The ground floor of the Castle contained Holmes’ own relocated drugstore and various shops, while the upper two floors contained his personal office and a maze of over one hundred windowless rooms with doorways opening to brick walls, oddly angled hallways, stairways to nowhere, doors openable only from the outside, and a host of other strange and labyrinthine constructions. Holmes repeatedly changed builders during the construction of the Castle so only he fully understood the design of the house he had created, thus decreasing the chance of being reported to the police.

RAM 2/9

RAM 2/9

Edward Zajec, RAM 2/9, 1969

( via translab)

Zajec/ComPlot

Zajec/ComPlot

Edward Zajec, RAM 13, 1969
Computer: IBM 7044
Printer: CalComp Plotter 563

Zajec writes of the evolution of his work in Artist and the Computer:

At first I designed programs in which, given a basic repertoire of signs and a set of combinatory rules, the qualitative value of each possible combination depended on a predetermined balance between probability and chance. Later, I tried to extend the autonomy of the programs by developing systems which could produce a number of different combinatory strategies. This was achieved by introducing a determinant tendency which kept referring to a few basic criteria for guidance and qualitative feedback.

Self Correcting Labyrinths and Virtual Journeys

Self Correcting Labyrinths and Virtual Journeys

Been awhile since BLDGBLOG showed up here, and this has been on my mind for the last month or so.

McElhinney went on to build his own full-scale “switching labyrinth” near London’s Euston Station. Participants in this experiment “animated” McElhinney’s switching labyrinth by way of “a stepper motor and slide mechanism” that, together, were “able to periodically shift, ‘switching’ openings to offer alternative entrance and exit paths.”

After watching all this unfold, McElhinney suggested that further research along these lines could help to reveal architectural moments at which there is an “emergence of labyrinthine, or familiar, spatialities within an unknown or changing maze framework.”

The labyrinthine caverns of Zork and the non-visual structure of Infocom games are mentioned, and I would love to see a visualization comparing human traversals of real-world maze-like spaces and navigations of those same spaces using virtual interfaces– both text-based and those rendered with state of the art first-person-shooter engines.

( via bldgblog)